World Book Night and Shakespeare Selfie Day

Join us at the Central Library on World Book Night for a FREE event in celebration of books and reading.

Doors open at 5pm for wine, nibbles and civilised mingling.

At 5:30pm hear the Book Givers talking about their books and how they’ve given away their copies.
(Some may still have copies to give away!)

Then at 6pm there will be a Shakespeare Quiz with Readings and prizes.

You can also celebrate Shakespeare’s 400th anniversary with a Shakespeare Selfie in our special selfie area… #shakespeare16

WBN logo in headline

Why not check out some of the great World Book Night titles available at Swindon Libraries – there are some cracking reads this year!  You can reserve items online free of charge via our online catalogue, choose which library you would like to pick them up from, then sit back and let us do the rest!
Shadow and boneshadow bone by Leigh Bardugo: The Shadow Fold, a swathe of impenetrable darkness, crawling with monsters that feast on human flesh, is slowly destroying the once-great nation of Ravka. Alina, a pale, lonely orphan, discovers a unique power that thrusts her into the lavish world of the kingdom’s magical elite – the Grisha. Could she be the key to unravelling the dark fabric of the Shadow Fold and setting Ravka free?
Now You See Me by Sharon Bolton: She can’t stop shivering. But this isn’t cold. This is terror. A savage murder on London’s streets, 120 years to the day since Jack the Ripper claimed his first victim. A crime with all the hallmarks of a copycat killer. Detective Constable Lacey Flint has never worked a murder case, until now. When another mutilated victim is found she agrees to be the bait to lure out the monster. But this killer is one step ahead, and already fixated on Lacey
Am I Normal Yetnormal yet by Holly Bourne: Evie, Amber and Lottie: three girls facing down tough issues with the combined powers of friendship, feminism and cheesy snacks. Both hilarious and heart-rending, this is Evie’s no-holds-barred story of struggling to live a ‘normal’ teen life in the grip of OCD
I Can’t Begin to Tell You by Elizabeth Buchan: Denmark, 1940. War has come and everyone must choose a side. For British-born Kay Eberstern, living on her husband Bror’s country estate, the Nazi invasion and occupation of her adopted country is a time of terrible uncertainty and inner conflict. With Bror desperate to preserve the legacy of his family home, even if it means co-existing with the enemy, Kay knows she cannot do the same. Lured by British Intelligence into a covert world of resistance and sabotage, her betrayal of Bror is complete as she puts her family in danger
Too Good to be Truetoo good by Ann Cleeves: When young teacher Anna Blackwell is found dead in her home, the police think her death was suicide or a tragic accident. After all, Stonebridge is a quiet country village in the Scottish Borders, where murders just don’t happen. But Detective Inspector Jimmy Perez soon arrives from far-away Shetland when his ex-wife, Sarah, asks him to look into the case. The local gossips are saying that her new husband, Tom, was having an affair with Anna. Could Tom have been involved with her death? Sarah refuses to believe it – but needs proof. Anna had been a teacher. She must have loved kids. Would she kill herself knowing there was nobody to look after her daughter? She had seemed happier than ever before she died. And to Perez, this suggests not suicide, but murder…
Rotter’s Club by Jonathan Coe: Unforgettably funny and painfully honest, Jonathan Coe’s tale of Benjamin Trotter and his friends’ coming of age during the 1970s is a heartfelt celebration of the joys and agonies of growing up. Featuring, among other things, IRA bombs, prog rock, punk rock, bad poetry, first love, love on the side. Prefects, detention, a few bottles of Blue Nun, lots of brown wallpaper, industrial strife, and divine intervention in the form of a pair of swimming trunks.
A Baby at the Beach Cafébaby by Lucy Diamond: Evie loves running her beach cafe in Cornwall but with a baby on the way, she’s been told to put her feet up. Let someone else take over? Not likely. Helen’s come to Cornwall to escape the stress of city living. She hopes a seaside life will be the answer to all her dreams. When she sees a job advertised at the cafe it sounds perfect. But the two women clash and sparks fly, and then events take a dramatic turn. Can the pair of them put aside their differences in a crisis?
Love Poems by Carol Ann Duffy: Whether writing of longing or adultery, seduction or simple homely acts of love, Carol Ann Duffy brings to her readers the truth of each experience. Her poetry speaks of tangled, heated passion; of erotic love; fierce and hungry love; unrequited love; and of the end of love
Reasons to Stay Alivereasons by Matt Haig: Aged 24, Matt Haig’s world caved in. He could see no way to go on living. This is the true story of how he came through crisis, triumphed over an illness that almost destroyed him and learned to live again. A moving, funny and joyous exploration of how to live better, love better and feel more alive, ‘Reasons to Stay Alive’ is more than a memoir. It is a book about making the most of your time on earth
Last Bus to Coffeevillecoffeeville by J Paul Henderson: Nancy Skidmore has Alzheimer’s and Eugene Chaney III has once more a purpose in life – to end hers. When the moment for Gene to take Nancy to her desired death in Coffeeville arrives she is unexpectedly admitted to the secure unit of a nursing home and he is constrained to call upon the help of his two remaining friends: Bob Crenshaw, a man who has been officially dead for 40 years, and Jack Guravitch, a disgraced weatherman in the throes of a midlife crisis. They ‘kidnap’ Nancy and drive to Mississippi in a stolen tour bus once owned by Paul McCartney
Someone Else’s Skin by Sarah Hilary: Called to a woman’s refuge to take a routine witness statement, DI Marnie Rome instead walks in on an attempted murder. Trying to uncover the truth from layers of secrets, Marnie finds herself confronting her own demons. Because she, of all people, knows that it can be those closest to us we should fear the most
treacheryTreachery by S. J. Parris: Summer, 1585. As English ships are held captive in Spain, fear mounts of an Invincible Armada, built by King Philip II, and intended to invade English shores. Sir Francis Drake prepares to embark on an expedition by royal commission to cross the Atlantic and seize major Spanish ports, diverting Philip’s American treasure supplies to Queen Elizabeth. Giordano Bruno, radical philosopher and spy, accompanies his friend Sir Philip Sidney to Plymouth to oversee Drake’s departure. Unbeknownst to Bruno, Sidney intends to join the mission – and he wants Bruno to go too. But when a ship captain is brutally murdered, and Drake’s life threatened, it becomes clear that someone plans to destroy the expedition before it begins
Perfect Daughter by Amanda Prowse: Jacks loves her family. Sure, her teenage children can be stroppy, her husband a little lazy, and providing round-the-clock care for her Alzheimer’s-ridden mother is exhausting. She’s sacrificed a lot to provide a safe and loving home, but all she wants is for her children to have a brighter future than she did. So long as Martha, the eldest, gets into university and follows her dreams, all her sacrifice will have been worth something … won’t it?

 

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